Countdown Sale #2

Nasty Leftovers | Guy L. PaceNasty Leftovers e-book version goes on Countdown Sale on Amazon Friday, Dec. 8, 2017, until Monday, Dec, 11, 2017.

This means that the book starts at $0.99 for 36 hours, then goes to $1.99 for 36 hours, then goes back up to the regular retail price. This is leading up to Christmas and the release of Carolina Dawn (release date still TBA).

Keep in mind that all my books are on Kindle Unlimited. This means that if you are an Amazon Prime customer, you can read them for free.

Tell you friends and family.

Keep reading.

Keep writing.

Done

Done | Guy L. PaceDone.

Nothing is ever–really–done. Especially writing.

I see places in Sudden Mission and Nasty Leftovers where maybe I could have written them a little better. Why? because I keep going back and re-reading parts. I read parts for events. Nothing brings a rough passage, a poor choice of words or phrase to the front like reading it aloud in front of an audience.

As I work through the first round of edits on Carolina Dawn from my editor and my “first reader” (wife) I find little phrases to improve and events to make more exciting. That means the editor will need to see these. And, I’ll have to go through it to review and accept the editor’s changes when it comes back.

You have to have the will and determination to stop. You must put the work down and move on to production. The whole point is to get it to readers. But, you want to get the very best possible story to your readers. So you give it one more pass through.

The problem with this is that every time you make changes, you have to run those changes before another set of eyeballs. You need that third party to look it over to make sure you haven’t made a horrible mistake, misspelled something, or made hash of a paragraph.

At some point in the process of writing, editing, rewriting, revising, and editing some more … you have to stop. Accept the editor’s changes, save the file and start formatting it for e-book and print. If you don’t, you’ll be stuck in this cycle forever.

Keep writing.

(Note: If you haven’t read the first two books, it might be a good time to do so. That way, you’ll be ready for Carolina Dawn when launchsd.)

 

The Unknown

The Unknown

Unknown Road | Guy L. PaceYou probably heard of or read the poem by Robert Frost of “The Road Not Taken.” It is sweet poetry and one most of us heard in school. My take is a little different. Any road traveled leads to the unknown. You can never predict what you’ll find around the next curve, or down that little lane through the trees.

It’s the unpredictable, the unknown, that helps drive the story and develop the character. As the author, you should have some idea of what is going to happen in the story. There is a purpose and reason behind the writing, after all. Right? But, sometimes you must let things surprise even you.

In Sudden Mission and Nasty Leftovers, I allowed the story and the characters to surprise me as I wrote. As the characters moved through the United States in the first book, and Washington, D.C. in the second, I had an idea about what they would find or do in the end. But I didn’t have a complete, detailed plan for how the characters would get to that end, or what they would meet on the way.

One mantra I use as I write is “what could go wrong now?” That usually brings surprises.

Adventure

Turn down an unknown road, take a new route–that’s where the adventure begins. The unpredictable, the unknown awaits beyond that next curve. You’ll find it down that tree-lined lane, or over that next hill. The drive to seek adventure is part of what makes us human. Characters we create for our stories are no less prone to taking that unpredictable turn, or finding that tree-lined lane irresistible. They will roll on the throttle and charge into the twisting curves of a new road with the same enthusiasm we have in the same situation. They seek adventure with wild abandon.

When your character finds the adventure–that’s when the story gets interesting. That’s when you drag the reader kicking and screaming into a fight against a horde of zombies. Or, encounter aliens for the first time, and your character isn’t sure if they are friendly or not.

Not everyone is open to adventure. Some are afraid of the unknown. Sometimes, that is all thrust upon them anyway. That tree-lined lane holds terror and horror for them. But, they must go down that lane and they must face that horror. This is a trope you find in horror movies and novels. The young babysitter hears a noise at the door. She approaches and the audience or reader shouts, “Don’t open the door!” But it is in our nature to open that door. Take that new road. Charge ahead. We can’t help it.

Sweet dreams, and …

Keep writing.

 

Something Simple

Something Simple

Old Timer | Guy L. PaceThere are times the tool you need to save the world is something simple.

The Old Timer pocket knife given to the main character, Paul, in Sudden Mission didn’t play a huge role right away. That changed in Nasty Leftovers. I’m not going to give anything away here. The Old Timer is a simple story element. Why did I choose an Old Timer. Well, almost every adult male I knew growing up carried one of these little knives made by Schrade. Grandpa had one. He wore the blades down to almost nothing because he’d used them so much and sharpened them so many times. He finally bought a new one. Probably paid all of five dollars for it then.

They are small and fit in a pocket. Most of the ones I saw when I was young were two-blade folders like the picture here. Simple. Useful. Vital. Easy to carry and always in the pocket. If you needed a bit of twine cut, there it was. Need to trim your finger nails? Here you go. Want to whittle a bit on a stick or carve a buffalo head out of a chunk of cottonwood? Yep, you got it.

Fathers handed Old Timer pocket knives down to sons. Or, granddads to grandsons.

Now this is from my memories growing up in the western US. Your mileage may vary. But, when you find that item in either book, you now know where it came from and why it holds so much value. Something simple. But something that fulfilled a tremendous role in the story.

Save the World

Can you save the world with an Old Timer? Maybe. Maybe not. You might be able to build a civilization with one. Or save a life.

When you put your own story together, think about the simple things attached to the character or the action. What impact do they, or could they, have on the outcome? What impact might they have on the character and his or her development? Are the other characters in the story impressed by this simple thing? Something simple can feed the story’s crisis and conflict, or help the main character find the solution.

We often overlook the little things. The simple things.

In the case of the Old Timer, it was something simple Paul carried around with him. Until he needed it.

Keep writing.

 

Note: This isn’t on Tuesday because, well, life. It happens. Enjoy!

Amazon

Amazon

Amazon | Guy L. PaceI’ve been working with some marketing people and trying different promotions on Amazon for Sudden Mission and Nasty Leftovers. As I move to the finish line on the third book, I want to have a stronger showing in the first two. While they have done well at times on Amazon, sales on the other e-book vendors have been abysmal. So, I had to come to a decision.

As of today, both books are only available, exclusively, on Amazon. Much as I wanted to have an open market for the books, it just wasn’t going to work.

There is a benefit for the reader, though. Via the KDP Select program, folks with Kindles and the Kindle app–along with an Amazon Prime or subscription account–can get and read both books for no added cost. That is in the Kindle Unlimited program that is part of KDP Select. You can still order your own e-book copy for $2.99, or the paperback (through a local bookstore or Amazon and shipped from Ingram Spark). But, if you want to just check it out and read it, that works, too. You can even lend a copy to a friend through the lending library feature.

I do have an option to opt out of the KDP Select in about 30 days. I do not expect that to happen.

I hope I’m not disappointing anyone. Amazon is what works and that’s where I have to take it. Thanks for your support.

Keep writing.