Error

Error

Error | Guy L. PaceEvery book you ever read had an error. Some typo, misspelling, missing word, misuse of there, they’re, or their.

It happens.

I know Sudden Mission and Nasty Leftovers have some errors. I stumble across a couple when I do a reading. It is unavoidable. Carolina Dawn very probably has a few errors that got past my editor and myself.

Fortunately, before I pushed up the final version of the e-book, I found a couple of errors. I intended for a specific passage as a block quote. And, there was a name change missed on one page. I was able to make those corrections, recompile the e-book and print documents, and got them pushed back up to Amazon and Ingram in plenty of time.

Tools

I use Scrivener for all my writing. Yes, the new version is great and once I sorted out how to edit format templates, things went well and complies were reasonably quick. To get the e-book format up to Amazon, you need to create a .kpf file and for that you need Kindle Create (on the Mac). That link may or may not work, depending on if you have a KDP account or not.

So, Scrivener was working great, then I got into Kindle Create (KC). It imported the e-book document just fine, and I worked through the formatting. But, then KC caused a hard crash on my Mac. No warning. Just BOOM!

After I got everything back in order on the Mac, sent off the error report and log files to Amazon’s KDP support folks, I got back to work. I saved frequently, and got out of the app every hour or so. It all worked out and I uploaded the .kpf file.

I seem to remember a similar crash on an earlier version of the Kindle tool that created the .mobi file (no longer supported). Oh, well. We move along.

Thanks for listening. Thanks for all the support, likes on Facebook, and retweets on Twitter.

Keep writing.

I will, too.

 

Cover for Carolina Dawn

Cover Reveal!

Carolina Dawn | Guy L. PaceThis is the cover for Carolina Dawn, the third and final book in the Spirit Missions series! This cover, created by Scott Deyett (InHouse Graphics) will grace the ebook editions of Carolina Dawn when it releases on February 14, 2018.

I think Scott did a great job here. I gave him some brief details on the main character, a little about the theme of the book and what Amy should have. Rather than stick with the dark blue theme of the previous books, he brought out the dawn for this one and it rocks.

The Title Breakdown

Carolina. The book takes place almost entirely in North Carolina. I hope y’all who live there can identify with the locations I use. Hope I didn’t destroy your house.

Dawn. Well, yes, there are a couple of scenes involving dawn breaking over North Carolina. But, you have to read the book to pick up why I used this title.

Print

Carolina Dawn Full | Guy L. PaceHere is the print version of the cover, full back, spine, and front.

Blurb on Back Cover

Amy Grossman must decide about Paul Shannon’s proposal. Guilt over Joe’s death still eats at her. Then there is Lucy–a competitor for Paul’s affection–to deal with. She also fills her days with gardening, handling power outages, and perimeter guard duty.

A stranger arrives with dire news turning Amy’s life new directions. With its very survival on the line, the community must pull together one more time.

She knows God has a plan for her, but surely ending up zombie food couldn’t be part of that plan.

Could it?

Well, could it? That’s the question. Carolina Dawn will go on Amazon pre-sale later this week.
Stay tuned.
Keep writing.

Countdown Sale #2

Nasty Leftovers | Guy L. PaceNasty Leftovers e-book version goes on Countdown Sale on Amazon Friday, Dec. 8, 2017, until Monday, Dec, 11, 2017.

This means that the book starts at $0.99 for 36 hours, then goes to $1.99 for 36 hours, then goes back up to the regular retail price. This is leading up to Christmas and the release of Carolina Dawn (release date still TBA).

Keep in mind that all my books are on Kindle Unlimited. This means that if you are an Amazon Prime customer, you can read them for free.

Tell you friends and family.

Keep reading.

Keep writing.

Countdown Sale #1

Sudden Mission | Guy L. PaceSudden Mission e-book version goes on Countdown Sale on Amazon Monday, Dec. 4, 2017, until Thursday, Dec, 7, 2017.

This means that the book starts at $0.99 for 36 hours, then goes to $1.99 for 36 hours, then goes back up to the regular retail price. This is leading up to Christmas and the release of Carolina Dawn (release date still TBA).

Keep in mind that all my books are on Kindle Unlimited. This means that if you are an Amazon Prime customer, you can read them for free.

Tell your friends and family.

Keep reading.

Keep writing.

 

Evidence

Evidence

Evidence | Guy L. PaceEvidence is a funny thing. Sometimes, what you think is evidence, isn’t.

As a jounalist (See SPJ’s Standards), attribution was always part of presenting facts. When you could not attribute information to a reliable source, an authoritative individual, or a direct witness, it became hearsay. When you reference an act and relate it to a possible perpetrator, you always use the word “alleged.”

For example: “Joe allegedly took the candy bar and left the store.” You don’t say he allegedly stole the candy bar, that would define the act. The act of taking the candy bar and leaving the store is an act of theft. However, the journalist is not law enforcement, nor judge and jury. The journalist is the conveyer of information. So, you don’t define the alleged act.

I won’t detail how certain recent New York Times articles completely ignore the SPJ’s standards.

Hearsay

As we move further into the story, we bring up more information.

“A witness said someone who saw Joe take the candy bar told them that Joe did actually take the candy bar.”

The above statement doesn’t name the source other than as a “witness.” Worse, the witness claimed that some other un-named person else actually saw the act. This can only be classified as hearsay and should have little or no place in the story. It encourages pre-judgement without direct evidence.

So, someone called the police, who arrest Joe and gather evidence. After review of the evidence, the police drop charges, and Joe goes home with his candy bar.

What Happened?

Well, evidence. There are rules of evidence and you can find them at these links:

Cornell Law

Rules of Evidence

I’m not going to go into great detail here, but the primary measure on evidence is relevance (See Rule 401). Hearsay does not stand up to the relevance standard.

If a journalist references third- and fourth-hand information (hearsay) without direct attribution, he or she did not do their job. So, they missed the part where the cashier told the police that Joe handed her a dollar before he left the store, and the part where the store security camera recorded the event completely (two examples of direct evidence collected by the police). Direct evidence shows “… the existence of a fact in question, without the intervention of the proof of any other fact ….”

Forensics

In my study and practice of digital forensics, my role involved identifying an actor and placing that person in a seat or in front of a device at a specific time. There is a rougher term for it I won’t use here. This involved gathering direct evidence from the device, from devices and/or services connected to the device, and from devices or equipment in the area (video cameras and recordings).

The important thing in the digital investigation was “chain of custody.” All devices and evidence gathered are carefully recorded, preserved, and the custody tracked. Any gap or mis-step that affected the chain of custody invalidates the evidence, and a judge will throw it out. Not only would a judge dismiss a case over a breach in chain of custody, your professional reputation as a digital forensics investigator could be ruined.

Relevance

So, what does this have to do with writing?

You must analyze a situation, scene, action in your fiction to make sure it reflects accurately any evidence, hearsay, and forensics practices you might use. Using these elements correctly, even in fiction, helps make the story more real, more believable.

Keep all this in mind, if you watch the television series, Wisdom of the Crowd. Crowdsourcing evidence is a slippery slope and violates so many of the rules of evidence, chain of custody, and promotes hearsay. So, exercise care and caution when exploring these topics.

Keep writing.