Guy L. Pace

Living to Write

Motivation

It’s tough to get motivated sometimes. But, where do you find motivation when there is so much work in front of you? During NaNoWriMo, I sat down daily and wrote. I hit my goal number of words or more each day. Every day was different. Some were easy. Some were hard, desperately hard. But, at Continue Reading

Smelly

Something is smelly. Things smell. Sometimes the smells are good, sometimes the smells are not good. In my current work in progress, the main character encounters a lot of different smells as she moves through the story. Riding in the back of a military truck is “hot, loud, and smelly.” Of course, that is pretty Continue Reading

Royalties

What are royalties? Royalties are the part of the price of a book that actually goes to the author after all other costs and fees. So, it doesn’t mean authors wear crowns. Here’s a little taste of the business side of writing and publishing. If you check out Sudden Mission and Nasty Leftovers on Amazon, Nook, Continue Reading

Voice

Voice It’s best to use active voice in fiction writing, they tell us. Passive voice we’d best avoid. I’ll break it down for you. Active voice keeps your reader engaged with action verbs. Passive voice puts the reader to sleep. Back in the day, my mentor in the Navy, Senior Chief Journalist Raymond P. Lucasey*, put it this Continue Reading

Opening Lines

Opening Lines The first chapter and scene of a novel begin with powerful, strong opening lines. These should grab the reader, show some potential conflict, set scene, and introduce the character. And, they should entice the reader to keep reading. The power went out. Again. Amy Grossman fumbled on the dresser for a candle and some matches. Continue Reading

Short Fiction

Short Fiction Writing short fiction helps you develop your craft. You learn the structure of a story, how to develop a character, and how to keep a story focused. A short story is usually between 3,000 and 7,500 words. Of course, this depends on your market. Some print and online magazines have their own ideas Continue Reading

Life

Life sometimes takes a turn. Sometimes it gets in the way. Sometimes it just gets kinda full. Believe me, I am not the world’s most disciplined writer. I work best under pressure of a deadline (thus my preference to use NaNoWriMo to complete first drafts). Getting through the first draft, or course, it a great Continue Reading

Get Mobile

Sometimes, you have to get mobile. Prior to the current version of Scrivener, I would save a copy of my current project to a thumb drive (USB flash drive, the little dongle that plugs into one of the holes on your computer) and carry it along with my laptop when I traveled. This worked fine, Continue Reading

What You Know

What You Know Most have heard this advice about writing: Write what you know. For new writers, especially younger ones, this is a confusing bit of advice. You want to write a mystery novel involving a murder set in Rome. Your mind is full of the plugs you’ll have: “International intrigue!” “Globe-trotting Sleuth!” But, then you Continue Reading

Templates

Templates I mentioned last week that Scrivener has templates for characters and settings to help you keep track of details. When you set up your project you choose the kind of project it will be. In this image I selected Fiction, and i have the choice of Scrivener setting up a n0vel, a novel with Continue Reading

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