Booksellers

Booksellers

This post is to bookstores and booksellers who buy or may buy my books.

BugBear Books | Guy L. PaceI recently got a shipment back from IngramSpark (the print-on-demand company). Of course, this is disappointing and frustrating. I had no idea who bought this lot and didn’t have a chance to help them sell the books. I communicated with Ingram hoping that there might be a way to help extend marketing by sharing some information. That’s not happening and it is no surprise. That information on their retailers is proprietary and they hold it closely.

So, I’m going around the long way.

If you purchase an order of my books for your inventory or for your store, fill out the contact form on the Connect page. Let me know that you bought them, how many, and if you would like some marketing support from me. I’ll post on this website to promote your business. I’ll post on Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest to help you sell the books to your customer base.

If we can arrange it, I’ll even visit your location for a reading/signing/Q&A. There are some limits to this, but I’m willing to make the effort.

I don’t mind having a supply of books on hand. It’s expensive getting a shipment from the printer of returned books. I can’t sell books damaged in shipping and handling. The best solution all around is to make sure books ordered from the print-on-demand company (IngramSpark, in this case) get to the bookstore or bookseller and get the marketing support from the author (me) they need to get sold.

I updated the contact form and made sure it works on the Connect page. If you tried and failed to use the form before this date, please let me know.

Let’s make this work. Especially for independent Christian bookstores and booksellers.

Thanks.

Subscribers

Be a Subscriber

I set up a gift code on Amazon for an e-book of Nasty Leftovers. On September 30, I will randomly select from my blog subscriber list someone who will receive this code.

Building and this list is important. It helps me get the message out about my books and projects. Those of you subscribed get the blog posts right away. You stay informed about the books, what’s coming, what’s happening. Folks not subscribed may miss a post that is also shared on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or elsewhere. Imagine your frustration if you miss a reading/signing event in your town or at your favorite bookstore!

So, if you are already subscribed, thank you. Encourage friends and family to subscribe. If you’re not subscribed, just click the little subscribe link on the page and subscribe. Simple.

I do not share any information, the list, or any personal information with any one else.

If you already have a copy of Nasty Leftovers and you end up the winner of the gift code, no worries. You can forward that to a friend or relative. Spread the love.

Don’t forget. If you live or are in Spokane this week, I’m reading/signing at Auntie’s Bookstore downtown at 7 pm, Thursday, September 15.

Thanks.

Keep writing.

 

Character Motivation

I use Twitter as a resource. If you follow me or check my Twitter profile, you’ll see I follow less than 200 people, and followed by just a bit over 200 folks. The folks I follow are one of three types: old friends, information security folks, writing folks. I say folks, because Twitter profiles are not always people, but include companies or organizations.

Anyway, the way I use Twitter is to focus on specific information. This garners real gems sometimes. Here’s one I’ll share. One Paul Fenwick posted a blog entry discussing how to undermine learning in children.

Paul Fenwick

While the focus of the article is on how we encourage or discourage learning and the studies done in 1998 and 1999, we as writers can take this information further.

How we speak (authors) to our characters in our fiction, and how our characters speak to each other, can affect their progress and motivation. The language we use can move the character forward, or have the character ring hollow. How do you describe a character who faces tough challenges, and fails. If the character values effort and learning (among other things), the character comes back and tries again and again until successful. The character who values “looking good” and fails, usually will give up after one or two failures. Any attempt to portray the character differently will seem wrong.

You may apply this concept to both the protagonist and antagonist characters. I’m thinking that young adult fiction should show these distinctions clearly in characters. Not just for character honesty, but to demonstrate the difference between valuing effort and learning over just looking good.

I could be wrong, of course. You are welcome to correct me.

Keep Writing.