The Bucket List

The Bucket List

Bucket List | Guy L. PaceThings change, the world changes, and we move ahead in time. Many of us have a bucket list, things we feel we need to do before we, ourselves, come to an end.

One of the things I’d love to do before I leave this plane is to travel the old Route 66 from Chicago, IL to Santa Monica, CA. My brother, cousin, and I talked about making that trip a lot last summer. The 2,448 mile trip would take about two to three weeks if we stopped to see all the sights.

Much of the old route faded into newer roads, highways, freeways. Still, you can find a lot of the old route’s highlights if you look for them. Finding and riding the old road–as much as is left–brings some of the legend and history of The Mother Road to life. Route 66 in the mid-1900’s displayed the character of America and you can still find and experience some of that today.

So, that’s one of the things on my bucket list.

The List

Another item on the list is to crate up the Harley, ship it to Europe, then ride it for two or three months all over the place. Some places in Europe I visited in the 1970’s and I’d love to go back and see the changes or the things that are still the same. I’d like to spend more time seeing the countries and seeing some friends.

A fascinating ride in Scotland would be the North Coast 500. Tourism in the UK bills the route as the Route 66 of Scotland, but I think it has its own attraction. The article suggests a three-day run due to small, slow winding roads threading through the highlands, lochs, and rugged coastline.

Some of the things in my bucket list drive what I’m writing about in my current work in progress. A Harley, an open road, and time. But, time is a limited commodity. Progress, politics (both national and international), economics, and other factors may conspire to prevent me from doing some of the things on the bucket list.

Route 66 is slowly disappearing and it may be gone before I get a chance to ride it. I do have a small piece of tarmac I picked off from the old road in Arizona from a trip in 1995. I keep it with a Route 66 key tag in my curio cabinet.

Why?

The items on the bucket list represent dreams we might have. Things we’ve always wanted to see or do. When you can reach down deep and find those dreams and desires, you can find the motivation that drives a character in a story. It’s what makes that character set out on the adventure, chase that dream, or follow a cause.

Time, though, is the enemy. The limiter of experience. Like Route 66 fading, or the far-off adventure ending before you get a chance. Your character must strive for the goal in spite of time.

So. Find the time.

Keep writing.

 

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The Unknown

The Unknown

Unknown Road | Guy L. PaceYou probably heard of or read the poem by Robert Frost of “The Road Not Taken.” It is sweet poetry and one most of us heard in school. My take is a little different. Any road traveled leads to the unknown. You can never predict what you’ll find around the next curve, or down that little lane through the trees.

It’s the unpredictable, the unknown, that helps drive the story and develop the character. As the author, you should have some idea of what is going to happen in the story. There is a purpose and reason behind the writing, after all. Right? But, sometimes you must let things surprise even you.

In Sudden Mission and Nasty Leftovers, I allowed the story and the characters to surprise me as I wrote. As the characters moved through the United States in the first book, and Washington, D.C. in the second, I had an idea about what they would find or do in the end. But I didn’t have a complete, detailed plan for how the characters would get to that end, or what they would meet on the way.

One mantra I use as I write is “what could go wrong now?” That usually brings surprises.

Adventure

Turn down an unknown road, take a new route–that’s where the adventure begins. The unpredictable, the unknown awaits beyond that next curve. You’ll find it down that tree-lined lane, or over that next hill. The drive to seek adventure is part of what makes us human. Characters we create for our stories are no less prone to taking that unpredictable turn, or finding that tree-lined lane irresistible. They will roll on the throttle and charge into the twisting curves of a new road with the same enthusiasm we have in the same situation. They seek adventure with wild abandon.

When your character finds the adventure–that’s when the story gets interesting. That’s when you drag the reader kicking and screaming into a fight against a horde of zombies. Or, encounter aliens for the first time, and your character isn’t sure if they are friendly or not.

Not everyone is open to adventure. Some are afraid of the unknown. Sometimes, that is all thrust upon them anyway. That tree-lined lane holds terror and horror for them. But, they must go down that lane and they must face that horror. This is a trope you find in horror movies and novels. The young babysitter hears a noise at the door. She approaches and the audience or reader shouts, “Don’t open the door!” But it is in our nature to open that door. Take that new road. Charge ahead. We can’t help it.

Sweet dreams, and …

Keep writing.